Dealing with Stress during the Coronavirus Outbreak

Dealing with Stress during the Coronavirus Outbreak

A strong service-orientation, a lack of time, difficulties in acknowledging or recognizing their own needs, stigma, and fear of being removed from their duties during a crisis may prevent staff from requesting support if they are experiencing stress reactions. Given this, employers and other support should be proactive in encouraging supportive care in an atmosphere free of stigma, coercion, and fear of negative consequences.

Relax your stress

Self-care for all involved can be complex and challenging, given that people in crisis may prioritize the needs of others over their own needs. Therefore, a self-care strategy should be multi-faceted and phased properly to support the sense of control and contribution without making them feel unrealistically responsible for the lives of others involved. For instance, in a crisis or stressful situation, one  should engage in these behaviors:

·         self-monitoring and pacing

·         regular check-ins with colleagues, family, and friends

·         working in partnerships or in teams

·         brief relaxation/stress management breaks

·         regular peer consultation and supervision

·         time-outs for basic bodily care and refreshment

·         regularly seeking out accurate information and mentoring to assist in making decisions

·         keeping anxieties conscribed to actual threats

·         doing their best to maintain helpful self-talk and avoid overgeneralizing fears

·         focusing their efforts on what is within their power

·         acceptance of situations they cannot change

·         fostering a spirit of fortitude, patience, tolerance, and hope

At the same time, they should avoid:

·         working too long by themselves without checking in with colleagues

·         working “round the clock” with few breaks

·         feeling that they are not doing enough

·         excessive intake of sweets and caffeine

·         engaging in self-talk and attitudinal obstacles to self-care, such as:

o    “It would be selfish to take time to rest.”

o    “Others are working around the clock, so should I.”

o    “The needs of survivors are more important than the needs of helpers.”

o    “I can contribute the most by working all the time.”

o    “Only I can do. . ..”

JOYRICH HEALTHCARE IS HERE TO HELP.

WE HAVE COUNSELORS AND LIFE COACHES TO GUIDE YOU THROUGH THESE DIFFICULT TIMES. CALL NOW FOR APPOINTMENT IN PERSON (WITH SOCIAL DISTANCING) OR OVER PHONE OR TELEVISIT.

LET US HELP YOU STAY WELL MENTALLY PHYSICALLY AND SPIRITUALLY.

Lori Wagner, MSN APRN
Acute and Adult Nurse Practitioner 

JoyRich Health Care Centers
859-967-9486

2 thoughts on “Dealing with Stress during the Coronavirus Outbreak”

  1. Good information, especially in times of uncertainty. IT is nice to see encouragement and ideas on staying calm and at peace. Thank you for posting this.

    Reply

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